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Thread: Controversial, no?

  1. #11
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    Nick wears his watch on his right wrist because after his plane crash His left arm was rather damaged, and it’s still uncomfortable to wear anything on his wrist. I’m pretty sure we had that conversation once.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Danger View Post
    Nick wears his watch on his right wrist because after his plane crash His left arm was rather damaged, and it’s still uncomfortable to wear anything on his wrist. I’m pretty sure we had that conversation once.
    You know, I wondered if that might be the case - good to know.

    I love the way language develops and the way words and expressions take on new meanings. Southpaw is a great example.

  3. #13
    Richie I agree about the way phrases and little sayings evolve and develop and the history behind them.

    Like the sticking up of two fingers dates back the English archers doing it to the French who used to cut their fingers off if they were caught so they couldn't fire a bow again.
    The medieval version of a machine gun I suppose. When each archer could have up to four arrows in the air at any one time.


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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaky View Post
    Interesting post Texzan, as I always thought it was a boxing term.
    You learn something new everyday !!!
    as far as I'm aware the origins of the expression 'southpaw' are unknown but there are earlier examples of it used in boxing than there are in baseball. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southpaw_stance

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaky View Post
    Richie I agree about the way phrases and little sayings evolve and develop and the history behind them.

    Like the sticking up of two fingers dates back the English archers doing it to the French who used to cut their fingers off if they were caught so they couldn't fire a bow again.
    The medieval version of a machine gun I suppose. When each archer could have up to four arrows in the air at any one time.


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    Love it! I wonder where 'the middle finger' salute comes from!

  6. #16
    Now that one I don't know.

    There are loads that have great back stories.

    Going off half cocked is another. Anyone know where that comes from ??




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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaky View Post
    Now that one I don't know.

    There are loads that have great back stories.

    Going off half cocked is another. Anyone know where that comes from??
    Some people also say ‘Going off half cooked’. The original expression is. ‘Going off half cocked’ which refers to early battles using flint lock or cap lock firearms. The half cocked position was the safety and priming position, so if you fired your weapon from that half cocked position, it wouldn’t always go off or get its full firing potential.
    Last edited by Captain Danger; 10-09-2017 at 02:48 PM.

  8. #18
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    It might also refer to my wife’s cooking.....

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by theancientmariner View Post
    as far as I'm aware the origins of the expression 'southpaw' are unknown but there are earlier examples of it used in boxing than there are in baseball. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southpaw_stance
    I stand corrected! I found more info here: CLICKY. There was a great show on the History channel called "America's Secret Slang" and I thought the southpaw one was on there, but maybe not. There were lots of other good ones, though.
    - TexZan -

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